Published on May 16, 2020

Abstract Ray Light Background Images

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In optics a ray is an idealized model of light, obtained by choosing a line that is perpendicular to the wavefronts of the actual light, and that points in the direction of energy flow. Rays are used to model the propagation of light through an optical system, by dividing the real light field up into discrete rays that can be computationally propagated through the system by the techniques of ray tracing. This allows even very complex optical systems to be analyzed mathematically or simulated by computer. Ray tracing uses approximate solutions to Maxwell’s equations that are valid as long as the light waves propagate through and around objects whose dimensions are much greater than the light’s wavelength. Ray theory (geometrical optics) does not describe phenomena such as diffraction, which require wave theory. Some wave phenomena such as interference can be modeled in limited circumstances by adding phase to the ray model.

A light ray is a line (straight or curved) that is perpendicular to the light’s wavefronts; its tangent is collinear with the wave vector. Light rays in homogeneous media are straight. They bend at the interface between two dissimilar media and may be curved in a medium in which the refractive index changes. Geometric optics describes how rays propagate through an optical system. Objects to be imaged are treated as collections of independent point sources, each producing spherical wavefronts and corresponding outward rays. Rays from each object point can be mathematically propagated to locate the corresponding point on the image.

A slightly more rigorous definition of a light ray follows from Fermat’s principle, which states that the path taken between two points by a ray of light is the path that can be traversed in the least time.

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Optical systems

  • Simple ray diagram showing typical chief and marginal rays
  • A meridional ray or tangential ray is a ray that is confined to the plane containing the system’s optical axis and the object point from which the ray originated.
  • A skew ray is a ray that does not propagate in a plane that contains both the object point and the optical axis. Such rays do not cross the optical axis anywhere, and are not parallel to it.
  • The marginal ray (sometimes known as an a ray or a marginal axial ray) in an optical system is the meridional ray that starts at the point where the object crosses the optical axis, and touches the edge of the aperture stop of the system.

Abstract Ray Light Background images gallery for free download

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